fbpx

Latest Digital Transformation Opinions


CTO Interview: Otavio Freire, SafeGuard Cyber

Dr Roger G. Johnston’s “Backwards” security maxim states: “Most people will assume everything is secure until provided strong evidence to the contrary.” The observation reflects our collective tendency to ignore potential vulnerabilities in products, services or technologies if acknowledging them interrupts our enjoyment of them or the utility they carry.

Of course, this pathology is rare in security teams, but highly present in users and consumers, who see technology as a means to an end and relish any new tool that promises to shave seconds of their daily routine. The most potent example this side of the millennium was Cambridge Analytica’s covert harvesting of our personalities via innocuous quizzes. But for today’s organisations – right here, right, now – what is the “Backwards” blindspot?


The big pivot: The new cloud strategy in 2020

In recent weeks we’ve all been disrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic, both personally and professionally. The changes have been swift and severe, bringing new meaning to the Boy Scout motto: “Be Prepared.”

While certain sectors, like the restaurant industry, have been brutally affected by lockdowns, we’ve also seen encouraging signs of last-minute ingenuity. At the end of March, national chain The Cheesecake Factory warned that it would not be able to pay rent. One month later, of the nearly 300 restaurants it operates, only 30 are currently closed. The chain is experimenting with imaginative take-out concepts, such as a special happy-hour menu and a new line of ice cream


Why organisations need to adopt Organisational Network Analysis now

It’s a turbulent time for many businesses as they face financial disruption and reckon with stay-at-home measures that disrupt business-as-usual. Organisations need a high-performing workforce more than ever, but simultaneously, HR departments are being forced to action redundancies, furloughs and pay cuts to ease the bottom line. 

Much attention has been placed on technology and tools that enable remote working, but comparatively less has been placed on a burgeoning subset of analytics that can help HR departments drive employee productivity and wellbeing during this critical period. It’s called Organisational Network Analysis (ONA).


How private and public hospitals can synchronise securely

March 21st will be remembered as the day that the NHS struck a major deal with private hospitals throughout the country in order to help combat the seismic capacity overload created by the Covid-19 pandemic. A truly powerful opportunity for positive collaboration but also a task of goliath proportions. 

Prior to the outbreak of Covid-19, the NHS had already been in the midst of updating and upgrading the technology that they use. Their ‘internet first’ policy is a huge undertaking in the adoption of new technology and the modernisation of outdated systems, but now with their partnerships with the private sector, it might not just be the NHS in need of transformation but also the UK’s private healthcare sector. 


Easy ways technology can sustain SMEs during and after the pandemic

With most of the world in lockdown due to COVID-19, it is certainly a difficult time for businesses, and particularly for SMEs and sole traders. While managers and owners might feel somewhat paralysed due to the closure of all but essential shops and services, there are ways in which technology can enable businesses to try… Read More


Why future-proofing infrastructure is more important than ever

Perhaps the number one issue facing businesses and society is the need to keep pace with digital transformation. But what does it mean to keep pace with digital transformation? In layman’s terms, think about it like this: The train is leaving the station, and individuals and organisations need to get on board quickly to achieve business goals.

The speed of technological change is constantly and explosively accelerating, with new topographies being rolled out faster every year. As the saying goes, everything which can be is being digitalised. If businesses and society cannot keep up these shifts they will struggle to scale and maybe even survive.


Digital transformation ROI starts with revisiting your objectives

In the last decade, few organisations would argue with the necessity of digital transformation; unfortunately, almost everyone would argue about what exactly “digital transformation” means. Now that many organisations are several years into their digital transformation efforts, that lack of definition has become a problem, in part because we’ve gotten to a moment where many leaders are curious about the ROI of their digital transformation initiatives – and rightly so. No major project should be undertaken without a clear sense of how to measure its ROI. It is, however, impossible to calculate ROI without an agreed-upon definition and a tangible, consistent goal. That may sound basic, but a lot of organisations launch digital transformation initiatives without agreeing on those two things. Here’s how to think about ROI if that’s the boat your organization finds itself in.


Digitalising healthcare: the key to being secure and agile

As enterprises go digital and integrate new technologies into their business, public sector organisations have been left scrambling to keep up with the new digital age. This is a mammoth challenge for a public institution like the NHS which operates across a massive scale and hosts huge amounts of data.

It’s not as simple as moving away from legacy infrastructure to a cloud platform in a few easy steps. It’s a complicated project that encompasses different areas including cyber security, networking, data and cloud. The issue facing the NHS and other public sector organisations is prioritising one area without compromising another. It’s a careful balancing act to ensure that the NHS can achieve its aim of becoming digital and agile, whilst deploying a stringent cyber security strategy in order to protect its new digital system, critical services and confidential data. 


Q&A: AI’s transformation of the energy industry, with Shell’s Dan Jeavons

Global energy giant Shell has invested heavily in AI and analytics as part of a digital strategy that has saved it over a billion in cost reductions, production increases and additional customer margins. Heading up the company’s data science team is Dan Jeavons, a data expert and digitisation enthusiast who has been repeatedly recognised for his contributions to the field. Ahead of his keynote session at London’s Big Data World next week, we asked Dan about Shell’s hugely successful data strategy and where AI’s benefits are being most keenly felt


Convenience — The next retail battleground

The pace of change in the retail industry is unrelenting and now is not the time for businesses to become complacent. Faced with a growing proliferation of online marketplaces and the fast-evolving demands of today’s omnichannel consumers, standing out among a crowd of competitors is no easy task.

In recent years, retailers have focused their investment efforts on wooing online shoppers in a bid to compete head-to-head with big name pure-play disruptors like Amazon. Yet, last year, online accounted for just 19 percent of all UK retail sales. So clearly, UK consumers still value the unique experiences and level of service encountered when shopping in a bricks-and-mortar store.


“We want to empower. We want to inspire” — Helping everyone in society thrive in today’s digital world

It has been clear for a number of years that those who lack the skills to navigate our digital world will either fall behind, fail to reach their potential or fall victim to online harms. As banks become more digitised, citizens will soon not be able to distribute money to their loved ones unless they are computer or app-literate. Tomorrow’s great business ideas will not blossom unless their architects can establish an online footprint. And smartphone-gazing children risk encountering a raft of dangerous content and individuals.


Evolving Your SaaS business for the 2020s

Entering a new decade, it’s easy to forget just how quickly the software-as-a-service (SaaS) model has evolved over the past 10 years. The rise of cloud-based software has helped to redefine the enterprise workplace, unleashing truly mobile and collaborative workforces and new customer-facing interactions. It’s also democratised IT management and stimulated a shift in technology adoption that’s transformed the way companies buy and consume products and services.



Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!