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Latest AWS publications


Team Ineos UK enlists AWS HPC services to help America’s Cup bid

Sir Ben Ainslie has hailed the new computing power available to Ineos Team UK as a “game-changer” in their preparations for the America’s Cup.

The four-time Olympic gold medallist has said the team’s use of Amazon’s cloud portfolio has allowed the team to run more simulations than ever before in preparation for the competition.

Sir Ben is team principal and will skipper Ineos Team UK at the 36th America’s Cup in New Zealand next year.


Microsoft and Amazon to help NHS allocate hospital resources effectively

The UK National Health Service has enlisted the services of some of the world’s largest tech firms to help it thwart the coronavirus outbreak.

First reported by BBC, the NHS has joined forces with Microsoft, Google, Faculty AI and Palantir to create data dashboards that use AI to display up to date information about Covid-19 transmission.


IBM, Amazon, Microsoft and Google mobilise supercomputing and cloud resources to fight Covid-19

IBM, Amazon, Microsoft, and Google are joining forces with the White House, the US Department of Energy, and other US federal agencies to deliver supercomputing power and public cloud resources to scientists and researchers working to address the novel coronavirus global pandemic.

As part of the newly-announced Covid-19 High-Performance Computing Consortium, the companies are making 330 petaflops of performance available to researchers attempting to understand the virus and form treatments that can be used for potential vaccines.


Lawyer backs AWS to partially succeed with JEDI court challenge

A federal judge has weighed in on the ongoing legal battle surrounding the $10bn military cloud contract awarded to Microsoft last October.

In February, AWS launched a legal battle over the decision to award the JEDI contract to its cloud rival, in which it accused President Trump of “well-documented” bias against Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and improper interference in the review process.


Cloud misconfigurations have cost organisations $5 trillion since 2018

Data breaches caused by cloud misconfigurations have cost organisations trillions of dollars and exposed billions of records since 2018, according to a report published by DivvyCloud, a supplier of security and compliance automation for cloud and container environments.

The US-based cloud security company revealed 33.4 billion records were exposed during 2018 and 2019, a rise of 80 percent. In total, these breaches cost organisations $5tn (when the number of records exposed is multiplied by the average cost per lost record, calculated by Ponemon Insitute at $150).



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