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Latest energy publications


Rethinking data centre Total Cost of Ownership

We are living in a Connected Everything Era, with data centres rapidly expanding and depleting environmental resources. As an integral part of urban communities, they require abundant spaces and remain the primary driver of global energy consumption in the foreseeable future.

This demand is disruptive during times of both peril and opportunity due to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Covid-19 has altered the demands of digital infrastructure 24×7 around the world. What we learned from previous economic dislocations, such as the dotcom bust or the 2008 financial crisis, is that data centre providers adapt, emerge, and stay resilient.


EU data centre consultants sound alarm over grid infrastructure resilience

More than half of data centre consultants in Europe have expressed concern about the capabilities of the local grid and energy infrastructure’s ability to meet current data centre demand.

That’s according to a new report from power and temperature solutions company Aggreko, which surveyed 700 data consultants who provide specific consultancy to data centre operators, with regards to design, energy and engineering.

Aggreko conducted the report to gauge how the sector views the resiliency of the electricity grid, as hyperscale, edge and colocation data centre construction continue apace.


Microsoft powers data centre servers with hydrogen fuel cells for 48 hours

Microsoft has continuously powered a row of data centre servers for 48 hours using hydrogen fuel cells, the tech giant announced Monday.

Microsoft powered a row of data centre servers for 48 hours using a 250-kilowatt fuel system built by Utah-based developer Power Innovations, based on a concept system tested at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2018.

The system uses proton exchange membrane or PEM hydrogen fuel cells which combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce water vapour and electricity.


Can data centres be transformed into flexible energy ecosystems?

Currently, only 10 percent of the so-called ‘critical raw materials’ used in data centres are recovered. If we want to further reduce the impact of data centres on the environment and our living environment, the percentage of devices and materials that are re-used or recycled will have to be drastically increased.

That is why a group of companies, universities and other parties – including Green IT Amsterdam – are starting a research programme under the name CEDaCI into circular models for data centres.


A deep dive into liquid cooling

It was once the preserve of older-style legacy mainframe computers, and until recently was considered by many as only applicable for high performance computing (HPC) requirements.

However, liquid cooling is today becoming a serious contender for mainstream applications, especially those emerging at the edge of the network. Deployed in unmanned, remote sites where high levels of reliability and low maintenance are key considerations, edge computing environments must remain as secure and resilient as their larger counterparts.



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