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Latest privacy publications


IT pros slam effectiveness of UK Covid-19 contact tracing app

Less than a quarter of IT experts believe the UK’s coronavirus contact tracing app will be effective, according to a survey.

Just under half (45 percent) said they were undecided about it, while almost a third (32 percent) believe the tool will not be useful in helping to contain Covid-19.


Tracking Covid-19 effectively rests on transparency

With a pandemic like the current COVID-19 currently affecting people worldwide, the question arises of how technology might be able to help contain the virus, help people recover, and help the economy rebound after the lockdowns. Finding the technology is easy. How we use the tools at our disposal responsibly and ethically is thorny and complex. 


UCL team designs Covid-19 tracking system that stores data away from the cloud

Scientists say they have developed a Bluetooth tracing system which is ready to be deployed into an app in the fight against coronavirus.

A team at UCL (University College London) have been working on the technology with data privacy experts to ease concerns of misuse.

Contact tracing has been widely discussed as a potential solution to help end the Covid-19 lockdown, following in the footsteps of Singapore, where a similar offering has been adopted.

The idea is to use Bluetooth technology to keep a log of those who have been in close proximity to you, and send out an alert if any anonymously declare themselves as tested positive, with advice on further steps to take.


British Airways and Marriott GDPR fines delayed again

The UK Information Commissioner’s Office responsible for enforcing compliance with data regulations has deferred £280 million in fines handed out to British Airways and Marriott Hotels for data breaches.

British Airways was landed with a record £183 million in July 2019 over a 2018 data breach that saw 380,000 customer payment cards compromised. While Marriott is facing £99 million fine, also issued in July 2019, over a data leak caused by Chinese hackers that affected around 339 million customers.


Zoom halts development to plug security holes

Zoom has apologised to users over security and privacy issues which have plagued the platform, pledging to make changes in the coming weeks.

The video calling platform said its usage has “ballooned” since the start of the coronavirus pandemic as millions of people were forced to work and study from home.



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