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Latest from James Orme


The final frontier? How to overcome the age-old remote office IT headache

In many businesses, from retailers and chain restaurants, to health services and government offices, it is the local remote branch which is the prime client interaction point and where the business and the customer meet face to face. As a result, it is where initial client satisfaction is formed and the loyalty journey gains momentum. But, as they are often located outside of where a core facility is for customer convenience, these sites typically don’t have extensive IT staffing and therefore lack the technical resources of core offices. But they do require advanced client service applications with local processing capabilities. If every branch office needs to have its IT configured and deployed separately and in-person, costs are seismic and, in many cases, cost-prohibitive. As a result, remote office edge computing becomes a trade-off between costs and managing delays, service roll out, and mixed customer satisfaction.


Turning science fiction into science fact

Technology innovation continues to restructure industries and redefine what’s possible – but how is it reshaping the experiences we want from our interaction with organisations? The future medical industry will see machines diagnose us, while humans hold our hands. A reality, definitely and less scary than you might first think. Think of a super-smart computer – or Artificial Intelligence –  that could instantly mine every piece of relevant medical research available on the planet relating to your symptoms to make a diagnosis and recommend treatment. Not just based on the intellect of your consultant, but that of every consultant and research scientist in the world! That would feel reassuring, right? But then having that human contact with your consultant, the empathy and support through your treatment would be a vital component. No human alone could offer this combination of insight and empathy. Who wouldn’t want this?  This is the frontier of medicine and healthcare delivery, all enabled through this perceived ‘scary’ AI.


British Airways and Marriott GDPR fines delayed again

The UK Information Commissioner’s Office responsible for enforcing compliance with data regulations has deferred £280 million in fines handed out to British Airways and Marriott Hotels for data breaches.

British Airways was landed with a record £183 million in July 2019 over a 2018 data breach that saw 380,000 customer payment cards compromised. While Marriott is facing £99 million fine, also issued in July 2019, over a data leak caused by Chinese hackers that affected around 339 million customers.


A cyber approach to coronavirus containment

What lessons can be learned from reviewing how we manage cybersecurity and applying it to an anti-Coronavirus campaign? In recent years, some in the cyber world recognize that there is a lot to learn from the biological world when protecting systems against viruses. Now, the Corona epidemic presents an opportunity for the medical world to learn something from the cyber world. To analyze the strategies selected by various countries, let’s review it through the lens of cyber strategies. Let’s begin by recognizing that cybersecurity is built in layers. There is no one magic solution or layer which will prevent all the possible attacks. Furthermore, in the cyber world, it has been realized for some time that it is impossible to protect everything for all eternity. There will be victims.


The future of video streaming – Training AI to see with the human eye

The latest research from Cisco says that global internet traffic will reach 4.8 zetabytes a year in 2022, or 150,700 gigabytes a second. Video will represent at least 80 per cent of the total internet traffic. That research was published before the current coronavirus pandemic, which may well have a dramatic change in the shape and per-type breakdown of global internet traffic as face-to-face meetings are being overwhelmingly replaced with video conference calls and live video streaming. For example, NAB, the biggest event of the year in media production and distribution, has recently announced it will switch to a virtual conference for the 2020 year, with live presentations and meetings taking place via video streamed over the web.


Half of UK tech firms fear missing out on Covid-19 state support

UK tech trade body techUK has released a second Covid-19 survey investigating the effects of the pandemic on the nation’s technology sector, building on an initial survey published last month that indicated the sector might be insulated from much of the impact.

Over 100 technology organisations responded to the updated urvey – half of them small businesses with less than 50 employees. techUK counts 850 companies as members that collectively employ almost half of UK tech sector employees.

Overall, the sector still seems cautiously optimistic that the most extreme economic effects of the outbreak can be avoided, with only 6 percent fearing a halt to trading in the short-term. Longer term, businesses are more uncertain, with 30 percent concerned about their ability to trade if restrictions are extended.


Creative Destruction: Why the 2020 enterprise generation needs open platforms, not an ‘app for that’

The dynamics of business today are tough and getting tougher. In 1965, the average company on the S&P 500 could expect a 33-year tenure on the index. By 2026, that’s expected to be 14 years. Or, looked at from another angle, about 250 of the 500 will be gone inside 10 years. The Kodaks, Blockbusters, and Yahoos disappear and are replaced, for a while at least, by the generation of Zoom and the makers of Snapchat and TikTok. Innosight, the company from which I borrow the above scary numbers, calls this Creative Destruction. Your nemesis comes from richly funded startups or internet royalty such as Amazon, Alibaba, and Google. It’s as likely to come from China or India as the US or Europe. Companies rise and fall faster than Icarus and tomorrow’s largest company in the world is the company you haven’t heard of today. To compete, companies must iterate and constantly reinvent themselves.


NHS needs urgent cyber support throughout outbreak, says think tank

The NHS needs greater cyber security support to prevent a crippling attack during the coronavirus pandemic, a think tank has warned.

Security experts at Chatham House claim the NHS may be ill-prepared to deal with the aftermath of a potentially devastating cyber threat and has suggested the Government seek urgent help to protect it.


Modernise applications to increase agility with DevOps

What do you do after you’ve started adopting Agile and DevOps principles? This session explains how successful realisation of the value of DevOps emerges from three primary axes: orchestration, quality and governance.


Nine ways to fail at cloud native

Cloud-native is the perfect recipe for innovation, adaptability and engineering excellence – when it goes right. When it’s not right, it can be a monster spaghetti, a quality headache, and frustratingly inflexible. Dr Holly Cummins shares stories about all the ways cloud-native can go wrong (and how to avoid them).


Unlock the full potential of your Cloud with IBM and Red Hat

In a world where the average organisation now utilises over seven discrete Cloud providers, it is becoming ever more critical to ensure that your Cloud strategy is open, portable and secure. In this session understand how the IBM & Red Hat acquisition is enabling organisations to accelerate their move to Chapter 2 of Cloud.


The DCIM maturity model: An important step to data centre efficiency and added value

Data centres are becoming more complex as the need for HPC (high performance computing), data bandwidth and latency outstrip the capabilities of legacy facilities. It is not simply customers generating more information throughput across the infrastructure.

The ability to collect actionable data, analyse and predict outcomes within the technical spaces provides one of the largest opportunities to eliminate energy wastage (up to 50% reduction in cooling energy costs), reduce CO2 emissions and reduce downtime risk. Data’s strategic importance to organisations has placed new pressures on technology networks to work to their optimum performance levels.



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