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Latest AI Opinions


CTO Interview: Breathing life into the British Heart Foundation’s tech agenda

Like many other companies seeking to orchestrate the raft of technologies entering the market, the British Heart Foundation recently appointed its debut CTO. Ursula Dolton, who has had a wide-ranging career, working for likes of Jaguar & Land Rover, Citi Group and in a variety of sectors, was chosen to steer the ship.

The charity, which provides support to the millions of people living with heart and circulatory disease and conducts invaluable medical research, has an ambitious goal of creating a “world free from the fear of heart and circulatory disease” by 2030. Ursula’s role is to ensure that technology – including data, AI, cloud computing – serves this objective.


How machine learning is changing the face of financial services

Business changes all the time, but advances in today’s technologies have accelerated the pace of change. Machine learning analyses historical data and behaviours to predict patterns and make decisions. It has proved hugely successful in retail for its ability to tailor products and services to customers.

Unsurprisingly, retail banking and machine learning are a perfect combination. Thanks to machine learning, functions such as fraud detection and credit scoring are now automated. Banks also leverage machine learning and predictive analytics to offer their customers a far more personalised user experience, recommend new products, and animate chatbots that help with routine transactions such as account checking and paying bills.


Q&A: George Tunnicliffe — Head of IT Ops, National Theatre

George Tunnicliffe has worked in IT across different sectors such as defence, charities, healthcare and in scenarios of rapid growth and transformation. The Cloud & Cyber Security Expo speaker walks us through his definition of positive security culture, and the myth that users are the weakest link the IT security chain


CIO Interview: Mitie’s IoT program is leveraging building data at scale

IoT is one of the key ways of sourcing data about how buildings and facilities are being used. That’s why over the last few years, Mitie, the UK’s largest facilities management company, has embarked on a journey to evolve from a manpower-driven business to a technology-driven business — with IoT as the key enabler.

Mitie is one of the largest strategic outsourcing firms in the UK, employing 50,000 across facilities management and professional services. IoT now serves all of the group’s business units, but the group’s energy management and mechanical and electrical maintenance clients have felt the most benefits.


Who watches the watchmen? Why Europe is right to ban facial recognition

The potential five-year ban on facial recognition technology in public areas by the European Commission and the condemnation by civil liberties groups of the introduction of facial recognition by the Met Police in the UK is not surprising. The health of our democracy demands trust, and the tech trust deficit is not closing. Too often, there is retroactive regret that not enough was done to prevent something from happening.


If organisations want to capture AI’s benefits, they need to get to work

“No company competes today by its access to electricity, and no company will compete by its access to AI.” That’s the prediction of Daniel Hulme, AI expert, lecturer and CEO at AI firm Satalia. 

For Daniel, today’s organisations are at a critical fork in the road. Successful companies will harness the power of AI and other emerging technologies to create more sustainable, purpose-driven companies. On the other hand, those who fail to use technology to adapt will exacerbate the “misery-inducing organisational design” that pushes skilled staff out the door.


Will 2020 kick-start the decade of the driverless car?

Currently, there’s a lot of posturing amongst the major car manufacturers, as they jockey for position in the autonomous vehicle chase, with most of them predicting that there will be some form of self-driving vehicle on the roads by the early to mid-2020s – most likely as ride-hailing services (think Uber and Lyft) or commercial transportation (set routes, set times). Similarly, other industry voices chorus that autonomous vehicles are “coming soon,” with everyday people now becoming more accustomed to the idea, too.

Notwithstanding the optimism, and before we all climb into robotically chauffeured cars or have our online goods delivered by people-less vans and trucks, there are still many hurdles to be overcome – not only from a technological, but also from a business, regulatory and ‘user’ point of view. Trial and error, never-ending learning, infinite software updates and our new-old friend ‘artificial intelligence’ are paving the road that autonomous vehicles will cruise on.

Quite rightly, people are both excited by and fearful of the prospect of truly autonomous transportation. Positive thoughts relate to the elimination of human error (an autonomous vehicle is unlikely to be pulled over for reckless or drunk driving, accidents due to drowsiness or heart attacks…). But the thought of technology literally with a ‘mind of its own’ driving on our open roads and neighbourhood streets, is also a scary idea.


Q&A: AI in Banking, with Clara Durodie — Executive Chair, Cognitive Finance Group

Clara Durodie’s company, Cognitive Finance Group, is spearheading the intelligent and ethical use of AI in the finance and banking sector. The Big Data & AI World speaker talks us through her life, ambitions, and the pervasive problem of AI ignorance…


CDO Interview: Do AI unto others as you would have AI done unto you

Like many new technologies, Artificial Intelligence (AI) brings us countless potential benefits while introducing a whole raft of new dangers. Dr Juergen Rahmel, Chief Digital Officer at HSBC Germany and an AI researcher, argues that a coherent approach to ethics is needed in this fast-expanding field. “It comes down to the decision: of all that we could do, what is it that we should do?”

At root, implementing ethical governance of AI is no different to businesses promising not to pollute rivers or use child labour. It is about “conducting business not only in an individually profitable manner, but also following a holistic approach which serves the collective.” Rahmel, who will be speaking at Big Data & AI World in London this March, focuses on ethical governance for AI at HSBC. What has he learnt?


Robots and the jobs we love to hate

We need to stop defining ourselves by what we do We tend to think about work in terms of “jobs”. You are a programmer, a doctor, a consultant, or a lawyer. When we introduce ourselves, convention dictates we talk about our jobs rather than who we are. The shorthand of our titles allows us to… Read More


AI, Cloud Computing and IoT: How digitalisation is driving dramatic IT changes in healthcare

Today, IT within the healthcare industry is undergoing profound changes. This has been driven, in part, by the development of advanced new treatments, including robotics, analytical imaging and robust data networks, which enable the lessons learned from pioneering medical practitioners to be distributed to peers around the world, more rapidly than ever before.

For healthcare providers, ensuring a quality environment of patient care is paramount. New technologies—from digital imaging to security-enhancing baby finders to “always-on” wearable technology—are helping to reduce errors, improve care, and decrease costs simultaneously.

In the 2019 Global Health Care Outlook Report Deloitte states that, “there is an exponential increase in the pace and scale with which digital healthcare innovations are emerging. Digital technologies are supporting health systems’ efforts to transition to new models of patient-centered care and helping them develop ‘smart health’ approaches to increase access and affordability, improve quality, and lower costs.”


10 data storytelling mistakes to avoid

We live in a data-saturated world. But data only matters if you can turn information into action. To get from one to the other, you need to tell a story about your data that any person at your company can understand. 

Why? Because numbers and charts don’t motivate people to seek better outcomes. Stories do.  

So how do you tell these stories? 

Here are ten mistakes to avoid in order to tell a good story (about your data) that will drive strategic business.



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