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Latest Big Data News


TikTok bans paid political adverts

TikTok has decided not to allow paid political adverts on its platform, as the 2020 US election fast approaches.

The video-driven social media app has made the move amid increased scrutiny over political advertising on other social networks, particularly Facebook.

TikTok attracts millions of people across the world, mostly younger users, making it a potential target to reach first-time voters.


UK signs ‘historic’ data sharing agreement with US

A “historic” agreement on sharing data will “dramatically speed up” investigations into criminals’ online activity, the Home Secretary has said.

Priti Patel and US attorney general William Barr signed the arrangement – the first of its kind – on Thursday evening when she visited Washington DC, the Home Office said.

Ms Patel said: “Terrorists and paedophiles continue to exploit the internet to spread their messages of hate, plan attacks on our citizens and target the most vulnerable.


Waze to share traffic data with UK transport authorities via Google Cloud

Mapping service Waze is to make data gathered from across the UK accessible to local authorities to help them plan transport upgrades in the future.

The tech firm’s maps use crowd-sourced data from users to update on traffic conditions and other live information about road congestion.


Google wins legal fight to keep ‘right to be forgotten’ EU-only

Europe’s top court has told Google it does not have to make the “right to be forgotten” available worldwide.

The measure already allows citizens in EU countries to demand any results about them considered “inadequate, irrelevant or… excessive” to be removed, if the search is carried out in an EU country – even though the web page would still exist, delisting from a search engine makes it harder for people to find.


Google gives users more control over Assistant voice recordings

Google has said it will reduce the amount of voice data it stores, following a scandal linked to AI assistants and how audio data from users was being listened to by human reviewers.

The technology giant said that while its own Voice and Audio Activity (VAA) programme has always been opt-in, it will now ask every user to re-affirm their choice before it recommences.


Gov.uk data collection probed by UK privacy regulator

The UK’s data and privacy watchdog is looking into how personal data on the Government’s main website is collected after it was reported the portal is being used to target users in preparation for Brexit.

A memo obtained by BuzzFeed allegedly tells departments to share data collected from its gov.uk, marked as “top priority” by the Prime Minister’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings.


Intel to use facial recognition and 3D athlete-tracking at Olympics

Facial recognition technology and 3D athlete-tracking to enhance the viewing experience of the Olympic Games will be used during Tokyo 2020, Intel has said.

The computer chip-maker, which is a leading partner of the major international multi-sport event, will be able to identify more than 300,000 people at the Games in Japan, including athletes, volunteers, media and other staff.


More than half of UK businesses not GDPR compliant

Despite it being over a year since GDPR was introduced, more than half of UK businesses are failing to comply with the legislation, a new report suggests.

The survey of 250 UK GDPR decision makers, conducted on behalf of data security firm Egress, found that 52 percent of businesses are not fully compliant with the regulation, which came into force in May 2018.


Komprise Deep Analytics automates unstructured data finding across on-premises and cloud storage

Data management platform Komprise has announced the general availability of Deep Analytics, a new tool that helps organisations find and analyse unstructured data across multiple on-premise and cloud storage platforms.

Deep Analytics combines with Komprise’s existing data search and indexing technology to automate the process of finding relevant unstructured data.


UK Police admit sharing images for King’s Cross Estate’s facial recognition

The Metropolitan Police and British Transport Police did share images with the King’s Cross Estate in London for its facial recognition technology, despite previously denying any involvement in the surveillance project, it has emerged.

Developers of the site – which is home to King’s Cross and St Pancras International stations, as well as restaurants, shops and cafes – said earlier this week that the system was used only to help both forces “prevent and detect crime in the neighbourhood and ultimately to help ensure public safety”.


Activist loses world’s first court challenge over facial recognition technology

Ed Bridges, 36, from Cardiff, brought the challenge at the High Court after claiming his face was scanned while doing Christmas shopping in 2017 and at a peaceful anti-arms protest in 2018.

His lawyers argued the use of automatic facial recognition (AFR) by South Wales Police caused him “distress” and violated his privacy and data protection rights by processing an image taken of him in public.


King’s Cross estate management says facial recognition technology ‘not used since March 2018’

Facial recognition has not been in use around the King’s Cross area of London since March 2018, the site’s developers have claimed.

Usage of the controversial technology has been under the spotlight after UK data and privacy watchdog the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) said it had launched an investigation last month.



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